only one sweet moment

odditiesoflife:

The Most Beautiful Trees in the World

  1. Portland Japanese Garden, Portland, Oregon. Photo by unknown.
  2. Red maples trees path. Photo by Ildiko Neer.
  3. Most beautiful wisteria tree in the world. Photo by Brian Young.
  4. Yellow autumn in Central Park, New York. Photo by Christopher Schoenbohm.
  5. Amazing Angel Oak Tree, Charlston, Photo by Mark Requidan.
  6. Cherry blossom tree path, Germany. Photo by Shoeven.
  7. California in autumn. Photo by Mizzy Pacheco.
  8. Jacaranda trees in bloom, South Africa. Photo by Falke.
  9. Ponthus beech tree in Brocéliande forest, France. Photo by Christophe Kiciak.
  10. Beautiful cherry blossom road. Photo by unknown.

pr1nceshawn:

Masculine Ways to Do Feminine Things by Dave Mercier.

radsturbate:

marry someone who has a different favorite cereal than u so they wont eat all of urs

sniffling:

the only advice you’ll ever need

sniffling:

the only advice you’ll ever need

kardashy:

its impossible to watch this and be sad

animal40:

contemporary art 

animal40:

contemporary art 

drtanner:

salmonking:

roachpatrol:

jumpingjacktrash:

the-real-seebs:

gendest:

because a lot of people dont seem to get this:

  • golems are from jewish folklore. dont treat them like a generic fantasy creature, thats appropriative
  • kabbalah is a specifically…

I play in a Klezmer band - that’s traditional Yiddish music, much of it nomadic, and Klezmer tunes are traditionally played at Jewish weddings and other celebrations. We were approached by a lady in her mid twenties before a concert (which was being organised by the Muslim Jewish Forum) who told us in a very confrontational manner that we shouldn’t be “appropriating Klezmer music for profit”, because none of us were Jewish.

What she failed to realise was that it was very common, hundreds of years ago, for Klezmorim to be non-Jewish, but still play Klezmer music for Jewish communities. This is because they LITERALLY DIDN’T CARE, THEY JUST WANTED TO DANCE TO SOME LOVELY MUSIC. Needless to say, we thanked her for her concern, but played the gig regardless.

As far as I’m concerned, we were just a bunch of students who’d been respectfully educated about Klezmer music, and through our academic studies had formed an ensemble as part of the Klezmer Revival (google it) in order to honour and remember a beautiful tradition.

Took that slightly personally, correct me if I shouldn't have done.
Anonymous

hey who is this and if we had a conversation really sorry but I don’t remember, idk I’m drunk a lot of the time these days and the modern age has rid me of any effective memory capacity outside of the complete works of Freddy Mercury and Billy Joel

I knew it! Gosh how talented you are
Anonymous

Ma petite chou-fleur, you have no idea.

toastdurr:

vagisodium:

i bet my tongue is stronger than yours wanna find out

hELL YES

image

millennium-lily:

And that’s the most frustrating thing about depression. It isn’t always something you can fight back against with hope. It isn’t even something — it’s nothing. And you can’t combat nothing. You can’t fill it up. You can’t cover it. It’s just there, pulling the meaning out of everything. That being the case, all the hopeful, proactive solutions start to sound completely insane in contrast to the scope of the problem.

It would be like having a bunch of dead fish, but no one around you will acknowledge that the fish are dead. Instead, they offer to help you look for the fish or try to help you figure out why they disappeared.
(x)

This is actually a really good way to explain it, I think.